Walsh Catalog 2021-2022

Walsh

Academic Policies and Requirements

A student enrolled in a course at Walsh must observe all academic policies and regulations in effect and published in the current Student Handbook, Academic Catalog, and in other official publications. It is the responsibility of the student to be aware of all changes in academic policy as implemented by Walsh. Any student wishing to be exempt from a specific academic policy as outlined in the Handbook or elsewhere must formally petition the specific administrative or academic department enforcing the policy.

Academic Honor Code

The Walsh academic community will maintain the highest ethical standards in our quest for academic excellence. We will not lie, cheat, steal, or claim credit for the ideas and work of others. We commit to respecting the intellectual property of others and will always acknowledge the authorship of intellectual property in all forms.

Academic Integrity Mission

To support Walsh students and faculty in their pursuit of authentic scholarship. Academic honesty and integrity is a fundamental principle for the entire Walsh community. The Academic Integrity committee provides programs, information and activities to ensure the Walsh community and the community at large are engaged in the tenets of Academic Integrity: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, responsibility and courage.

Academic and Professional Conduct

Walsh students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner conducive to continued growth toward a business or professional career. A professional demeanor with a high degree of ethical conduct is expected. Written and oral communications, including paper and electronic, should reflect professionalism. All students are expected to attend classes regularly and be fully prepared. Students are responsible for being knowledgeable and observing all Walsh policies and procedures.

Academic Records and Transcripts

A student’s academic transcript reflects all courses taken, credit hours attempted, and grades received while in residence at Walsh; these are used to compute the student’s semester and cumulative grade point averages. An official transcript bears the Walsh seal, the registrar’s facsimile signature and transcript issuance date. Academic standing designations such as probation and dismissal are noted on the student’s transcript.

Graduate courses taken as part of the student’s undergraduate program are posted on the student’s undergraduate transcript. All grades and credit hours attempted and earned will be used in computing the student’s cumulative grade point average for purposes of graduation, with the exception of those courses and grades that have been replaced under the Course Repeat Policy. Courses repeated under this policy will be excluded from the cumulative grade point average calculation. Undergraduate courses taken by a graduate-level student will appear on a non-degree transcript and will not be computed into the student’s graduate grade point average.

Academic transcripts will reflect all courses taken, applicable credit hours attempted, and grades received while in residence at Walsh for all students including those who are readmitted or who change majors or degree programs prior to graduating from Walsh. Once a student graduates from a degree program, a new cumulative grade point average will be computed for the subsequent degree.

Academic transcripts are maintained in the Records and Registration office and are regularly audited and corrected as necessary. A student wishing to inquire about their record should contact the Records and Registration office at records@walshcollege.edu.

Calendar

Walsh operates on a semester calendar system. The academic calendar for all programs consists of four 11-week semesters per year. All courses and credit hours are stated in semester credit hours. The current academic calendars can be found in the Student Handbook, the Catalog and on the Walsh website.

Course Numbering System

Courses Numbered 200-499

Courses with these numbers are undergraduate level courses. Undergraduate, graduate, and non-degree students are eligible to enroll in these courses for undergraduate credit and are assessed undergraduate tuition rates.

Courses Numbered 500-699

Courses with these numbers are graduate level courses. Graduate, certificate and non-degree students are eligible to enroll in these courses for graduate credit and are assessed graduate tuition rates.

Undergraduate students cannot enroll in these courses unless permitted in their undergraduate degree program. See the section entitled Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Courses. Graduate level courses taken by undergraduate students as part of their undergraduate degree program will appear on their undergraduate transcript. Students are responsible for paying graduate tuition.

Courses Numbered 700-899

Courses with these numbers are doctoral level courses. Doctoral students are eligible to enroll in these courses for doctoral credit and are assessed doctoral tuition rates.

Grading System and Policies

Bachelors and Masters Grading Scale

Most bachelor's and master's courses taken at Walsh are recorded by letter grade (A-F); the 4-point system (4.000) is used to compute the grade point average (GPA). Grades are awarded according to the following system:

BACHELORS AND MASTERS GRADING SCALE
Grade Grade Points per Credit Hour
A 4.0
 A- 3.7
  B+ 3.3
B 3.0
 B- 2.7
  C+ 2.3
C 2.0
 C- 1.7
  D+ 1.3
D 1.0
 D- 0.7
F 0.0
THE FOLLOWING GRADES ARE NOT COMPUTED IN GPA:
Grade Description Grade Points per
AU Audit O*
I Incomplete O*
NR No grade reported O*
N Not Passing O*
P Passing
W Withdrawal O*

*Not included in computing hours, grade points or GPA. Included in computing hours, but not included in computing grade points or GPA.

For all bachelor's degree programs, the grade of “C” (2.000) is the minimum acceptable grade for many courses. As a graduation requirement, an undergraduate student must maintain a 2.000 for both the overall cumulative grade point average and for the cumulative grade point average in their major. For undergraduate degree programs, satisfactory academic progress is a cumulative grade point average of 2.000 or better.

For all master's programs, including dual degree programs and graduate certificates, the grade of “C” (2.000) is an acceptable grade for the purposes of course completion for all courses. However, a 3.000 overall cumulative grade point average must be achieved as a requirement for graduation. Satisfactory academic progress is a cumulative grade point average of 3.000.

“AU” (audit) denotes that the student is enrolled in a course for no grade and no credit. Upon completion of the course, a grade of “AU” will be noted on the student’s academic transcript. The decision to audit a course should be made at the time of registration. Once the add/drop period ends, a student cannot change their registration status from credit to audit or from audit to credit. A student desiring to audit a class must pay full tuition and fees. A designation of “AU” will be allowed only once per course. A grade of “AU” will automatically be issued to a student who repeats a course in which they have previously received equivalency transfer credit, an exclusion, waiver or advanced standing. After grade replacement, once a course has been completed at Walsh with a grade of “C” or better, all subsequent attempts will receive a grade of “AU” and no credit.

“I” (incomplete) is a temporary grade used by an instructor in cases when the student is unable to complete course requirements because of illness or other justifiable circumstances.

An incomplete grade can only be issued if:

  • Approved in advance by the instructor

  • The remaining coursework cannot be completed for reasons clearly beyond the student’s control

  • The student has only a minor portion of the semester’s coursework to complete

  • The work completed to date is not less than “C” (2.000) in quality

  • The remaining coursework can be completed within four weeks after the end of the semester in which the “I” is granted.

The student must initiate the request for an incomplete grade with the instructor of the course. If the incomplete grade is granted, the instructor will issue an “I” grade when submitting their final grades. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor and make arrangements for completing the remaining work within the four-week timeframe. If the coursework is not completed within the four-week period, the grade of “I” will be changed to the grade of “F” (failing). The student will be notified of the grade change.

“NR” (no grade reported) is a temporary grade indicating the final grade has not yet been submitted. The “NR” grade will be replaced by the appropriate letter grade (A-F) when submitted by the instructor.

“N” (not passing) is only used in courses that are graded on a pass/no pass basis and indicates that the course has not been completed successfully.

“P” (passing) is only used in courses that are graded on a pass/no pass basis and indicates that the course has been completed successfully.

“W” (withdrawal) indicates the student has withdrawn from the course. This grade earns no credit for purposes of graduation and is not included in a student’s grade point average computation. However, the grade does appear on the student’s academic transcript. A student may withdraw from the same course no more than twice during their academic career. Withdrawing from separate sections of courses that are equated will be considered separate withdrawal attempts. A letter grade of A through F will be issued on a student’s academic transcript when the withdrawn course is repeated for the third time.

 

Doctoral Grading Scale

Most doctoral courses taken at Walsh are recorded by letter grade (A-C and F); the 4-point system (4.000) is used to compute the grade point average (GPA). Grades are awarded according to the following system:

DOCTORAL GRADING SCALE
Grade Grade Points per Credit Hour
A 4.0
B 3.0
C 2.0
F 0.0
THE FOLLOWING GRADES ARE NOT COMPUTED IN GPA:
Grade Description Grade Points per
I Incomplete O*
NG No grade O*
NR No grade reported O*
W Withdrawal O*

*Not included in computing hours, grade points or GPA. Included in computing hours, but not included in computing grade points or GPA.

Grade of “C” or Better

Students in the doctoral program may earn a grade of “C” (2.000) one time only. A second grade of “C” (2.000) will result in automatic dismissal. If there are extenuating circumstances, a student may appeal the dismissal. Reentry into the program will be determined by the Doctoral Program Committee.

Grade of “F”

Any work below the level of “C” (2.000) is considered failing and will be issued the grade of “F” (0.000). A student who earns a grade of “F” (0.000) in any one course will be automatically dismissed from the program. If there are extenuating circumstances, a student may appeal the dismissal. Reentry into the program will be determined by Doctoral Program Committee.

Grade of “NG”

A grade of “NG” (No Grade) will be used as a placeholder for doctoral students who are completing their dissertation courses.

Grade of “NR”

A grade of “NR” (No Grade Reported) is a temporary grade indicating the instructor has not yet submitted his/her final grades. The “NR” grade will be replaced by the appropriate academic grade once it has been submitted by the faculty member.

Grade of “I”

A grade of “I” (incomplete) is a temporary grade used by an instructor in cases when the student is unable to complete course requirements because of illness or other justifiable circumstances.  An incomplete grade can only be issued if:

  • Approved in advance by the instructor

  • The remaining coursework cannot be completed for reasons clearly beyond the student’s control

  • The student has only a minor portion of the semester’s coursework to complete

  • The work completed to date is not less than “C” (2.000) in quality

  • The remaining coursework can be completed within four weeks after the end of the semester in which the “I” is granted.

The student must initiate the request for an incomplete grade with the instructor of the course. If the incomplete grade is granted, the instructor will issue an “I” grade when submitting their final grades. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor and make arrangements for completing the remaining work within the four-week time frame. If the coursework is not completed within the four-week period, the grade of “I” will be changed to the grade of “F” (failing). The student will be notified of the grade change.

Grade of “W”

A grade of “W” (Withdrawal) indicates the student has withdrawn from the course. This grade earns no credit and is not included in a student’s grade point average computation, but the grade does appear on the student’s academic transcript. A student may withdraw only one time from each course during his or her academic career. A letter grade of A to C or F will be issued on a student’s academic transcript when the withdrawn course is repeated.

A student who withdraws from only one course in a semester must meet with the Doctoral Program Director to develop a plan of work.

The Doctoral Program Director will review each student’s academic performance periodically. To remain in good standing, students must maintain a minimum cumulative 3.000 Grade Point Average (GPA) in Walsh College coursework taken after admission to the Program. Students with a GPA below 3.000 will be placed on academic probation. Students who do not meet the terms of the academic probation will be dropped from the Program.

Cumulative Grade Point Averages

A student’s cumulative grade point average is computed by dividing the total grade points earned to date by the total number of hours attempted. Grade point average calculations are carried out to the third position after the decimal point. Grade points are calculated by multiplying the number of credit hours for the course by the number of points earned on the grading scale. For example, a grade of B for a 3-credit hour course produces 3 (credit hours) x 3 (points for a grade of B), or 9 grade points. The grade of “F” (0.000) is included in the calculation of cumulative grade point averages. When a student repeats a course under the Course Repeat Policy, both grades will appear on the academic transcript, but only the better grade will be used to compute the cumulative grade point average. If, after the one-time replacement, the course has not been passed, all subsequent grades will be factored into the cumulative grade point average along with the better of the original and replaced grades. Only courses taken at Walsh are used to determine a student’s grade point average.

Major Grade Point Averages - Undergraduate Students

In addition to maintaining an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.000, undergraduate students are required to maintain a 2.000 grade point average in their major courses. A student’s major grade point average is computed by dividing the total grade points earned for all major courses by the total number of hours attempted in those courses. All courses taken within the major, credit hours attempted, and grades received will be used to compute the student’s major grade point average, with the exception of those courses and grades that have been replaced under the Course Repeat Policy. Courses repeated under this policy will be excluded from major grade point average calculation. Please refer to the Undergraduate Graduation Requirements section of the Catalog for each individual program for the courses that are used to compute the major grade point average.

Semester Grade Point Averages

A student’s semester grade point average is computed by dividing the total grade points for that semester by the number of credit hours attempted. Grade point average calculations are carried out to the third position after the decimal point. The grade of “F” (0.000) is included in the calculation of grade point averages.

Viewing Grades

Grades may be viewed online by logging in to the Walsh Student Portal. Click on Self-Service for Students and select My Academic Records.

Appealing Final Grades/Grade Changes

A student who questions or wishes to clarify a grade must contact the instructor and provide specific arguments for the grade change to resolve the dispute within four weeks after the start of the next semester. A request by a student to dispute their grade after this four-week period will not be considered.

If an error has been made, the instructor must submit an official change of grade to the Registrar and Director of Records and Registration certifying reasons for the change of grade. Upon receiving documentation from the instructor, the Registrar and Director of Records and Registration will change the grade and post the grade on the Walsh Student Portal (click on Self-Service for Students and select My Academic Records to view). In exceptional or unusual circumstances, the Registrar and Director of Records and Registration may determine that additional signature approval must be obtained by the department chairperson and/or chief academic officer (or approved designee) prior to processing the grade change.

Step 1 – Instructor

Contact the class instructor involved to resolve the problem. If resolution cannot be achieved at the instructor level, a student can petition the chair of the department involved. The student may not proceed to step two until the final grade is discussed with the instructor.

Step 2 – Department Chair

The department chair will investigate the matter and attempt to resolve the issue. The chair will notify the student and the class instructor of the decision. The student may not proceed to step three until the final grade is discussed with the department chair.

Step 3 – Final Appeal

If resolution cannot be achieved at the departmental level, a final review may be conducted by the chief academic officer. It must be demonstrated to the chief academic officer that an instructor’s evaluation was based entirely or in part on factors that are inappropriate or irrelevant both to academic performance and applicable professional standards. In this case, the chief academic officer will have the student’s performance reassessed and good faith evaluation established. The decision of the chief academic officer is final.

*If the Instructor or department chair do not respond to your initial correspondence within seven business days, please contact the Academic Office at 248-823-1635 for assistance.

Undergraduate Earned Credit Policy

Undergraduate credit is earned for a course only when the student is issued a grade of “D-” (0.700) or better, except for those specific courses, or their substitute(s), in which a grade of “C” (2.000) or better is required. All grades from Walsh undergraduate coursework will be used to compute the student’s undergraduate cumulative and major grade point average, with the exception of those grades that have been replaced under the Course Repeat Policy. Grades replaced under this policy will be excluded from the cumulative and major grade point average.

Undergraduate students may enroll in approved graduate level (500 or 600 level) courses for up to 12 semester credit hours. All graduate courses taken and grades received under this status will be reflected on the student’s undergraduate transcript and will be used in computing the student’s cumulative grade point average for purposes of graduation. Students are responsible for paying graduate-level tuition and course fees. Please note that students cannot switch from the undergraduate version of a course to the graduate version of the course after the add/drop period ends in any given semester.

An undergraduate student who wishes to take a graduate course to fulfill their undergraduate degree requirements should contact their academic advisor to determine if the course may be applied as advanced standing to any Walsh graduate degree program.

Graduate Earned Credit Policy

All grades from Walsh graduate coursework will be used to compute the student’s graduate cumulative grade point average, with the exception of those grades that have been replaced under the Course Repeat Policy. Grades replaced under this policy will be excluded from the cumulative grade point average. A graduate student may enroll in undergraduate courses. Students must complete a non-degree application for admissions in order to take an undergraduate course. Grades received in an undergraduate course will be noted on a non-degree transcript and will not be computed in the student’s graduate cumulative grade point average.

Doctoral Earned Credit Policy

All grades from Walsh doctoral coursework will be used to compute the student’s doctoral cumulative grade point average. With approval of the Doctoral Program Chair, a doctoral student may enroll in a graduate level course. All graduate and doctoral level coursework will be computed in the student’s doctoral cumulative grade point average.

Clean Slate Policy

Masters students who have not attended Walsh for at least one-year (12 consecutive months) and are reapplying for admission to any master's program or certificate may request a one-time review of their previous academic coursework for exclusion from the grade point average (GPA) calculation under their new program. Courses chosen to be excluded from GPA calculation will include all attempts of the course. Under this policy, all courses, grades, and academic standing notations will still appear on the student’s academic transcript, but the student’s cumulative GPA for the new program will only include previous coursework required or used as electives under the new program. Students are required to sign a Clean Slate Policy form and a notation that the Clean Slate Policy has been invoked will appear on the student’s transcript. After invoking the Clean Slate Policy, the student’s transcript will not be updated until the student registers under the new program.  Courses used as part of Clean Slate, in a program in which the student graduated, cannot be used toward advanced standing, waivers, or exclusions in subsequent programs.

This option allows courses and grades from the student’s previous master's degree or certificate program to be excluded from their new degree or certificate program with the following stipulations:

Previously completed courses will not be excluded from cumulative grade point average (cumulative GPA) calculations for the new academic program if the course meets one of the following criteria:

  • Any course, including those that are dual listed, and all attempts of that course, that is a required course in the student’s new degree program
  • Any course, including all attempts of that course, that the student has chosen to include as an elective course in the new degree program
  • Any course that is being counted to reach the total number of required credit hours for a new master's degree or certificate
  • Courses whose grades have been affected by findings of academic misconduct

Copyrighted Material Policy

In accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material by any means (including peer-to-peer file sharing) may subject an individual to civil and criminal liabilities in addition to violating Walsh College internal policies.

Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws

Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement.

Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see: Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505.

Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense.

For more information, please see the Web site of the U.S. Copyright Office at https://www.copyright.gov/, especially their FAQ’s at https://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/.

Summary of Walsh College Penalties for Unauthorized File Sharing of Copyrighted Material

Upon a first offense, individuals will receive a written warning. If by nature of technology used the individual cannot be located, Internet access for the computer used will be suspended until a warning can be delivered.

Upon a second offense, disconnection of Internet service will occur.

Upon a third or subsequent offense, sanctions can include disciplinary probation, other sanctions as directed, and/or dismissal from the College.

Legal Sources of Online Content

EduCause maintains a list of legal sources of online content at http://www.educause.edu/legalcontent. Members of the Walsh community are encouraged to check that site to ensure they are compliant with the law.

Course Repeat Policy

The Course Repeat Policy will apply to all Walsh programs.

The grade of any eligible course repeated beginning fall 2012 may be replaced one time, regardless of when the course was taken previously or how many attempts of the course were made prior to fall 2012. This policy applies only to courses that are repeated fall 2012 or later.

Any eligible course, regardless of grade, may be repeated once at Walsh for a grade replacement.

There is no appeal process to this limit. Additional repeats will be allowed without grade replacement. If, after the one-time replacement, the course has not been passed, all subsequent grades will be factored into all GPA calculations, along with the better of the original and replaced grades.

Courses that are not eligible for grade replacement:

  • Courses that have been graduated in any program may not be replaced in that program
  • Courses for which transfer credit has been awarded
  • Courses whose grades have been affected by findings of academic misconduct
  • Courses that are dual listed

Students who repeat courses at other institutions will not receive transfer credit if Walsh credit has been earned, nor will they improve their Walsh grade point average. A grade of Audit (“AU”) will automatically be issued to a student who repeats a course in which they have received course equivalency transfer credit, an exclusion, waiver or advanced standing.

All grades will remain visible on the transcript. All academic standings originally calculated will remain visible on the transcript.

In any one program, credit can only be earned once for any course.

Withdrawn classes will not replace grades and will not be included in the one-time grade replacement limit. Students will still be allowed two withdrawals in addition to one replacement attempt per eligible course. In the case of a withdrawal, a grade of “W” will appear on the transcript.

Federal and/or state regulations may supersede portions of this policy. For example, students with financial aid or GI Bill® benefits are required to follow federal regulations regarding repeating courses. Please see the financial aid and veterans’ sections of the Student Handbook for details.

Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

After grade replacement, once a course has been completed at Walsh with a grade of “C” (2.000) or better, all subsequent attempts will receive a grade of Audit (“AU”) and no credit.

Doctoral Programs

After grade replacement, once a course has been completed at Walsh with a grade of “B” (3.000) or better, all subsequent attempts will receive a grade of Audit (“AU”) and no credit.

Credit Hour Policy

Credit Hour Definition

The U.S. Department of Education (DOE) defines the credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than 15 hours of instruction for each credit hour plus an additional two hours of out-of-class student work for each credit hour. In addition, an equivalent amount of work is required for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Walsh’s credit hour policy complies with this DOE requirement for both undergraduate and graduate programs:

• For every credit awarded, Walsh requires 15 hours of direct faculty instruction (plus an additional 30 hours of homework or out-of-class study).

  • As an example, three credit courses will have 45 hours of direct faculty instruction (plus 90 hours of out-of-class study or homework)

  • For a three credit course offered in an 11-week semester, 4-5 hours of direct faculty instruction are required each week, regardless of delivery method

  • Walsh assumes that direct faculty instruction time may include breaks of up to 10-minutes per hour

• On campus or live synchronous courses (via Zoom, for example) will be scheduled for the required amount of time

• Online courses or online content will include the required amount of equivalent direct instructional time, as established by Walsh’s “Workload Calculator”

• Blended or hybrid courses will combine the direct faculty instruction time for both on-campus or live synchronous content together with online equivalent content as needed to meet the total  number of credit hour required

"Direct faculty instruction" is defined as the amount of time the faculty member is personally interacting with students within the context of the classroom. These are activities the instructor would need to be a part of or present for in some way. Examples include: Lectures, group or class discussions, Q&A sessions, a quiz or exam, and explaining instructions or expectations.

“Homework” or out-of-class study is defined as any activity an instructor would not conduct during in-class time. Students are expected to do these activities independent of the instructor and regular class meeting time. Examples include textbook or outside readings, working on assignments, writing papers, research, practice quizzes, homework problems, or independent project construction.

Walsh’s “workload calculator” is used to verify online instructional parity to parallel on-ground instruction and ensure content meets quality standards of delivery, as follows:

1. In class / screen time activities:

a. Lectures – calculate approximately 15 minutes per Word page-length lecture.

b. Videos, Voice-over PPT, Camtasia – add the run time and multiply by 2. (Example: a 5-minute video = 10 minutes of screen/seat time, or 5 minutes times 2 = 10 minutes)

c. Activities included in the weekly modules – test them out and determine length of time.

d. Quizzes – add in the amount of time allotted for any quizzes. Approximately 1.5 – 2 minutes per question, based on a multiple choice delivery. However, this may be longer for quantitative and qualitative type exams. (Professor and ID should discuss).

e. Discussions – The instructor will need to determine how long he/she expects a student to spend on the discussion board each week and clearly communicate this information to students. “It is expected that to succeed on the discussion board you will spend a minimum of x-hours (i.e., one hour) interacting with your peers….etc.”

f. Web conferences / online chats – The professor will need to provide guidance as to the length of chat.

g. Other activities as determined.

Degree Completion Policy

In order to graduate, undergraduate and graduate students must complete a degree program within 60 consecutive calendar months (five years) from the initial date of enrollment at Walsh (as designated by the first semester attended on the student’s Walsh transcript).  Doctoral students must complete their program within 84 consecutive calendar months (seven years) from the initial date of enrollment at Walsh (as designated by the first semester attended on the student’s Walsh transcript).

Should it appear that this time limit might not be met, undergraduate and graduate students should immediately consult with an advisor in the Admissions and Academic Advising office to request an extension. This request will be forwarded to the academic department chair for review and approval. If an extension is requested and granted, coursework more than five years old may be reviewed for currency. Additional coursework may be required to complete the degree. If an extension is not granted due to an insufficient portion of the program requirements having been completed, the student must update to the current degree program. Credit will be applied toward a degree for coursework less than five years old in which the grade of “D-” (0.700) or better has been earned, with the exception of courses which require a “C” (2.000) or better to fulfill graduation requirements. All graduate courses require a minimum grade of “C” (2.000).

A readmitted undergraduate or graduate student who is granted credit for previously taken courses may be required to complete the program in a period of time less than 60 months (five years). The transcript of a readmitted student will reflect all courses taken, credit hours attempted, and grades received while in residence at Walsh.

Doctoral students must successfully complete all coursework and final dissertation within a maximum of seven years (84 months) after commencing in the program. Any exceptions beyond the stated criteria will be determined by the Doctoral Program Director. If a student is in good academic standing and stops out for medical or extenuating circumstances, the student may re-enter the program without reapplying for admission for up to one year from the stop out term. The student will be required to petition for re-entry into the program and must meet with the Doctoral Program Director to work out a re-entry plan.

Residency Policy

Bachelor of Accountancy and Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree candidates must complete a minimum of 45 semester credit hours in residence in the BAC or BSIT programs at Walsh. Bachelor of Business Administration degree candidates must complete a minimum of 42 semester credit hours in residence in the BBA program at Walsh. Bachelor of Science in Applied Management degree candidates must complete a minimum of 30 semester credit hours in residence in the BSAM program at Walsh. However, certain undergraduate students may be eligible to transfer up to a maximum of 9 additional semester credit hours of approved equivalent junior/senior (300-400) level coursework from a regional accrediting organization recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and U.S. Department of Education (USDE), www.chea.org. These additional transferred semester credit hours may reduce the number of hours required in residency by a corresponding number.

A graduate degree candidate must complete the following minimum residency requirements (excluding foundation coursework) at Walsh:

  • Master of Business Administration degree requires a minimum of 24 semester credit hours in residence in the MBA program at Walsh.
  • Cyber Master of Business Administration degree requires a minimum of 24 semester credit hours in residence in the MBACYBER program at Walsh.
  • Design Master of Business Administration degree requires a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in residence in the MBADESIGN program at Walsh.
  • International Tech Master of Business Administration degree requires a minimum of 24 semester credit hours in residence in the MBAITECH program at Walsh.
  • Tech Master of Business Administration degree requires a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in residence in the TECHMBA program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Accountancy degree requires a minimum of 18-24 semester credit hours in residence in the MAC program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Data Analytics degree requires a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in residence in the MBA program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Finance degree requires a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in residence in the MSF program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Information Technology degree requires a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in residence in the MSIT program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Information Technology Leadership degree requires a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in residence in the MSITL program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Management degree requires a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in residence in the MSM program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Marketing degree requires a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in residence in the MSMKT program at Walsh.
  • Master of Science in Taxation degree requires a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in residence in the MST program at Walsh.
  • Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Finance degree requires a minimum of 39 semester credit hours in residence in the MBA/MSF program at Walsh.
  • Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Information Technology Leadership degree requires a minimum of 42 semester credit hours in residence in the MBA/MSITL program at Walsh.
  • Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Management degree requires a minimum of 33 semester credit hours in residence in the MBA/MSM program at Walsh.
  • Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Marketing degree requires a minimum of 36 semester credit hours in residence in the MBA/MSMKT program at Walsh.
  • Dual Master of Science in Accountancy and Master of Business Administration degree requires a minimum of 36 semester credit hours in residence in the MAC/MBA program at Walsh.

A certificate candidate must complete the following minimum residency requirements at Walsh:

  • The Cybersecurity certificate requires a minimum 9 semester credit hours in residence in the Cybersecurity certificate program at Walsh.
  • The Data Analytics certificate requires a minimum 9 semester credit hours in residence in the Data Analytics certificate program at Walsh.
  • The Global Project and Program Management certificate requires a minimum 9 semester credit hours in residence in the Global Project and Program Management certificate program at Walsh.
  • The Human Resource Management certificate requires a minimum 9 semester credit hours in residence in the Human Resource Management certificate program at Walsh.
  • The Strategic Business Communication certificate requires a minimum 9 semester credit hours in residence in the Strategic Business Communication certificate program at Walsh.

A doctoral student must complete the following minimum residency requirements at Walsh:

• All doctoral programs require a minimum of 30 semester credit hours in residence at Walsh.

Academic Misconduct

Walsh students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that is professional, ethical, honest, and in accordance with generally recognized standards of academic conduct. All coursework including, but not limited to, examinations, quizzes, homework exercises, projects, presentations, online discussion boards, papers or other assignments should reflect professionalism and appropriate academic standards.

By choosing to attend Walsh, both students and faculty members agree to the provisions of the Academic Misconduct Policy, including its rules, policies and disciplinary actions.

Academic Misconduct Standards

If any administrator, faculty, staff or student body member suspects a student of engaging in academic misconduct, that person must report it to the Academic Conduct Committee. Academic misconduct is defined as any act of commission or omission by a student designed to affect the grade of that student or another student, where such act is unfair, unethical, or outside of the rules of Walsh, the rules set by the academic department, or by a classroom instructor (for the instructor’s course).

Academic Misconduct includes but is not limited to:

  1. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the use of another’s work, words, ideas or images without properly citing the source and thereby representing this work as one’s own, whether the representation is oral or written, expressed or implied. Examples include:
    • Failure to give credit for work (including ideas and materials) taken from other sources (public or private), including quoting, paraphrasing, rephrasing or condensing that work
    • The submission of one’s academic work from a previous course without prior written approval of the current instructor
    • Using graphics, graphs, images, tables or other illustrative work without giving credit to the original source
    • Using materials that were assembled by or collected by others without acknowledging their contribution
    • Contributing to another student’s work or helping another to plagiarize
  2. Cheating: Cheating includes, but is not limited to, the following actions in regards to coursework:
    • Unauthorized collusion on coursework, including two or more students working together to prepare and submit the same or substantially similar coursework, or portions of coursework, without the specific consent of the instructor
    • Sharing of completed or partially completed coursework which includes, but is not limited to, examinations, quizzes, homework exercises, projects, presentations, discussion boards, papers or other assignments, except where expressly allowed by an instructor for a particular course
    • Use of unauthorized aids while completing coursework
    • Failure to follow administrative instructions on exam-taking or other assessment procedures
    • Completing coursework, including taking an examination, for another student or asking or paying someone else to do the same
    • Allowing another person to access online coursework to review, copy, submit, or complete that coursework
    • The theft, sale, purchase, unauthorized procurement or possession of examinations or other coursework (or any attempt to do so)
    • Copying another student’s work

    Unauthorized distribution or uploading of copyrighted materials, including but not limited to:

    • Any portion of course content such as, lectures, presentations, videos, assignments, examination or quiz questions, etc.
    • Library materials subject to copyright whether or not noted as “do not copy.”
    • Copying of library materials designated “do not copy”

    Damage, destruction or modification to Walsh computers/servers/printers including but not limited to:

    • Copying, modifying or removing software
    • Unauthorized uploading of computer software and/or introducing a virus or malware
  3. Misrepresentation or Deception: This includes intentionally lying to or deceiving a member of Walsh’s faculty, staff, administration, or outside agency in order to gain academic advantage for one’s self or another; or to misrepresent or in other ways interfere with the investigation of a charge of academic misconduct.

Penalties for Academic Misconduct:

Possible disciplinary actions or sanctions include, but are not limited to, one or more of the following:

  • Re-doing the assignment for a reduced grade
  • A reduction in the earned grade on the assignment
  • A directed zero on the assignment
  • A reduction in the overall semester grade
  • Loss of Walsh-awarded scholarship money or awards
  • A directed “F” in the course
  • A review of all prior coursework completed at Walsh, which may lead to new charges of misconduct should earlier violations have occurred, whether they were addressed at the time or not, up to and including possible reversal of grades earned in prior courses, or degrees revoked, if evidence is found indicating that misconduct was employed in the pursuit of those earlier grades or degrees
  • Suspension from Walsh
  • Expulsion from Walsh

Academic Misconduct Process

The suspected misconduct should be reported promptly to the Academic Conduct Committee, which will examine the evidence, determine whether the student was a repeat offender, and impose the appropriate disciplinary action and/or remediation. Formal documentation of the infraction will be noted in the student’s file. Under no circumstances shall any faculty, staff or administrator determine their own punishment or remediation for academic misconduct.

A student may appeal a finding of academic misconduct by applying in writing to the Academic Conduct Committee AcademicConduct@walshcollege.edu within seven calendar days of notification for an appointment to appear before the Committee.

A final written appeal may be directed to the office of the chief academic officer of Walsh, who in their discretion, may affirm, modify, or reverse the decision. In all instances, the decision of the chief academic officer is final.

Other Consequences of Academic Misconduct

A student who receives a disciplinary action for academic misconduct or is being investigated for misconduct:

  • May not withdraw from the course at any time
  • May not seek financial relief for withdrawal
  • May not utilize the grade replacement feature of the Course Repeat policy
  • A finding of academic misconduct will become a permanent part of the student record. Subsequent acts of any level of academic misconduct will be considered a basis for suspension or permanent expulsion from Walsh

Responsibility of Faculty Members

All faculty members must promptly report all apparent instances of academic misconduct to the Academic Conduct Committee. Under no circumstances shall any faculty member determine on their own a punishment for academic misconduct.

Academic Misconduct Disciplinary Designations

Disciplinary action for academic misconduct can take multiple forms. For academic misconduct, disciplinary action may include those listed under Section B. The most serious disciplinary procedures include suspension and expulsion, as defined below.

Suspension from Walsh;

A suspension will terminate the student’s status at Walsh for a specified period of time, not to exceed one year. This may be posted on the student’s academic transcript at the direction of the chief academic officer.

At the end of the specified period, the suspended student will be required to request reinstatement to Walsh. If granted, the student will be admitted conditionally. Any additional act of academic misconduct committed during the remainder of the student’s academic program will result in permanent expulsion from Walsh, without the possibility of appeal.

Expulsion from Walsh;

Expulsion from Walsh will permanently and irrevocably terminate the student’s status at Walsh. This may be posted on the student’s academic transcript at the direction of the chief academic officer. An expulsion may not be appealed and the student will be permanently barred from earning a Walsh degree.

Academic Standing Policy

Grade point averages and academic standing designations are computed for each student at the end of each semester. Students enrolled in degree and certificate programs are required to maintain acceptable academic progress in accordance with the following definition:

Satisfactory Academic Progress

2.000 cumulative GPA:

Bachelor of Accountancy

Bachelor of Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Applied Management

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

3.000 cumulative GPA:

Master of Business Administration

Cyber Master of Business Administration

International Tech Master of Business Administration

Tech Master of Business Administration

Master of Science in Accountancy

Master of Science in Accountancy for Accounting Graduates

Master of Science in Data Analytics

Master of Science in Finance

Master of Science in Information Technology

Master of Science in Information Technology Leadership

Master of Science in Management

Master of Science in Marketing

Master of Science in Taxation

Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Finance

Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Information Technology Leadership

Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Management

Dual Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Marketing

Dual Master of Science in Accountancy and Master of Business Administration

Cybersecurity certificate

Global Project and Program Management certificate

Human Resource Management certificate

Doctor of Business Administration

Doctor of Management

Probation

A student will be placed on academic probation whenever their cumulative grade point average (cumulative GPA) falls below satisfactory academic standing; either a 2.000 or 3.000 cumulative GPA, depending on their academic program. Probation status is calculated based on cumulative credit hours attempted and grades received at Walsh and are noted on the student’s academic transcript. Once a student’s cumulative GPA falls below the minimum required to maintain satisfactory academic progress, the student will be placed on their first semester of probation. Undergraduate and graduate students then have three additional semesters in which to improve their cumulative GPA to a satisfactory level.

If satisfactory academic standing is not achieved after four semesters of attendance, the student will be dismissed from Walsh. All graded semesters, including courses with grades of “W” are counted toward the maximum semesters of probationary status. However, any semester in which a student has received all “AU, N or P” grades will not be counted as one of the four semesters. A student may elect to take a semester off while on academic probation.

Student’s academic advisor will contact student to review academic standing requirements and develop a course plan to improve their academic standing. Probation students may be required to reduce their course load. This determination will be made in conjunction with their academic advisor. A full tuition and fee refund, excluding registration and international student fees, will be issued for courses dropped due to probationary status as determined by their academic advisor.

When the student’s cumulative grade point average reaches the minimum GPA required for their degree program, the student will be in good academic standing and probation restrictions will no longer be applicable. However, all academic standing notation(s) remain on the student’s academic transcript. Students on academic probation who have not enrolled for four consecutive semesters (12 calendar months) must reapply for admission and, if readmitted, will be placed on the same level of probation as in their last semester of enrollment at Walsh.

Doctoral students are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average (CUM GPA) of 3.000. If a student’s CUM GPA falls below 3.000 for any given semester, the student will be placed on academic probation and will be required to meet with the Doctoral Program Director to determine their continued viability within the program and any necessary remediation processes necessary to ensure student success.

Academic Dismissal

Undergraduate and graduate students whose cumulative grade point average (cumulative GPA) remains below satisfactory academic standing for four semesters of attendance will be academically dismissed from Walsh for a period of one year.

Academic dismissal is calculated based on cumulative credit hours attempted and grades received at Walsh. Academic dismissal is noted on the student’s academic transcript. A student who has been academically dismissed will be contacted by the Assistant Director, Advising Training and Systems or designee, administratively dropped from all course(s) and will be issued a full tuition refund including fees.

A doctoral student who has failed to pass the Preliminary Exam and Proposal Presentation Defense after two attempts will be dismissed from the program. The student will be administratively dropped from all courses and will be issued a full refund including tuition and fees incurred that semester. The academic standing designation of dismissal will be noted on the student’s academic transcript.

Permanent Dismissal

A second dismissal from Walsh is final. Permanent dismissal from Walsh will irrevocably terminate the student’s status at Walsh. A permanent dismissal may not be appealed and the student will be ineligible to enroll in courses, reapply for admission, or earn a Walsh degree. A student who has been permanently dismissed will be contacted by the Assistant Director, Advising Training and Systems and administratively dropped from all course(s) and will be issued a full refund including tuition and fees.

Readmission after Dismissal

After a period of one year (12 consecutive calendar months) undergraduate and graduate students may be eligible for readmission to Walsh. Readmission is permitted only when the student’s cumulative GPA calculation shows the possibility of achieving satisfactory academic standing in three consecutive semesters. An academic advisor will establish the minimum grade per course required to achieve satisfactory academic standing within the three-semester time limit. Any previous coursework will be reviewed for applicability under the new academic program at the time of readmission.

All courses previously taken, credit hours, grades received, and academic standing notations remain on the student’s transcript. A student must meet with their academic advisor to determine eligibility for readmission. If readmitted, the student will be placed on the academic program in effect at the time of readmission. In any given semester, failure to achieve the minimum required grade will result in recalculation of minimum grade requirements. A second dismissal may result if the student is unable to achieve satisfactory academic standing within the remaining semester requirement. In some circumstances, readmitted students may be permitted to take more than one course per semester, if the student can provide sufficient rationale. If approved, the minimum grade per course and course load will be established in conjunction with their academic advisor based on the grades required to achieve satisfactory academic standing. Satisfactory academic standing must be achieved within the established number of credit hours or semesters, whichever comes first.

A second academic dismissal from Walsh is final; students will not be eligible for readmission. A student who has been academically dismissed will be contacted by the Executive Director, Admissions an Enrollment Services and administratively dropped from all course(s) and will be issued a full refund including tuition and fees.

After a period of one year (12 consecutive calendar months), a student who has been academically dismissed may be eligible for readmission to the doctoral program. Doctoral students must contact the Doctoral Program Director to request a review and approval for readmission.

In addition to Walsh’s academic standing policy, the Financial Aid office is required to maintain its own satisfactory academic progress (SAP) policy. Students receiving federal financial aid should refer to the section entitled Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Recipients in this handbook.

Applying for Graduation

Students are required to apply for graduation for degree and certificate programs five months prior to their intended graduation date. Graduation application forms are available through the Walsh Student Portal. Once an Application for Graduation is submitted, a fee will be charged. A preliminary graduation audit will then be completed and notification of the status of the application will be sent to the student’s Walsh email account.

Graduation Applications may be carried over to a future semester but are only valid for a total of four consecutive semesters. If a Graduation Application has exceeded the four-semester limit, the student will be required to complete a new Application for Graduation and resubmit the graduation application fee.

A separate fee for the cap and gown is assessed for students who choose to participate in Commencement ceremonies.

Graduation Application Deadlines

Winter Semester (Ending in March) November 1
Spring Semester (Ending in June) February 1
Summer Semester (Ending in September) May 1
Fall Semester (Ending in December) August 1

Commencement Ceremonies

Walsh hosts two Commencement ceremonies per year. All eligible candidates/graduates will receive information concerning dates, cap and gown purchase, tickets, time, location, and other relevant information two-three months prior to the ceremony.

Academic Honors and Awards

Academic Recognition

Undergraduate students who complete a bachelor’s degree program and achieve high academic grade point averages are officially recognized by Walsh upon graduation. The cumulative grade point average used for academic honors is computed at the time of graduation, is based upon all coursework included in hours attempted in residence at Walsh, and will be noted on the student’s academic transcript and diploma.

The following honors designations will be noted on the academic transcript and diploma:

3.900–4.000 Summa Cum Laude
3.750–3.899 Magna Cum Laude
3.500–3.749 Cum Laude

In addition, honors recognition is given at Walsh Commencement ceremonies. The cumulative grade point average used to determine academic honors eligibility, for the ceremony only, will be the cumulative GPA on record as of the last graded semester of attendance prior to the ceremony.

Undergraduate honor graduates who participate in Commencement ceremonies will be recognized by the following honor cord color designations:

Gold Honor Cord - Summa Cum Laude (3.900–4.000)

Silver Honor Cord - Magna Cum Laude (3.750–3.899)

White Honor Cord - Cum Laude (3.500–3.749)

Honors are not awarded at the graduate or doctoral level.

Honors Lists

Walsh recognizes undergraduate students for outstanding academic achievement. Undergraduate students who have completed a minimum of 12 semester credit hours in residence at Walsh are eligible. At the end of each semester, enrolled students who achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.500-3.749 are named to the Honors List. Those with a 3.750-4.000 GPA are noted on the President’s Honors List. The names of students who attain these academic achievements may be published in the Walsh Journal. The Honors Lists may also be submitted to local publications.

Awards

Walsh students are eligible to earn the following prestigious academic awards. Award winners are presented with a certificate at Commencement and a plaque is inscribed with their names and displayed at Walsh.

Everett Hawley, Jr. Taxation Award

This award promotes excellence in the study of taxation in the Walsh College Master of Science in Taxation program. Named for the former chair of the Walsh College Board of Trustees, the award annually honors a graduate Taxation student for outstanding academic achievement. 

The Financial Executives Institute Award

Each year, the Financial Executives Institute honors one outstanding undergraduate and one outstanding graduate accounting or finance student for academic achievement. The student is presented with a medal at a Financial Executives Institute Detroit chapter meeting.

The Walter B. Fisher Award for Excellence in Accounting

This award is given annually to one Walsh undergraduate student who demonstrates outstanding achievement in the Bachelor of Accountancy program. Those chosen for the award must achieve a cumulative GPA of 3.500 or better and must have contributed time or talent to either Walsh or the accounting profession through tutoring, club leadership, community service, or other activities. The student is also presented with a cash award.

The Institute of Management Accountants Annual Award

Each academic year, the Institute of Management Accountants honors two undergraduate accounting students specializing in Certified Management Accounting for outstanding achievement. The students are also presented with a cash award.

The Mark J. Solomon Capstone Award

This award promotes excellence and dedication to the study of taxation. Named for the former Tax chair at Walsh College, and the driving force behind the Walsh College Master of Science Taxation degree program, the award annually honors a graduate Taxation student whose work in the MST Capstone class represents the effort, creativity, and technical excellence that Professor Solomon strived to instill in his students.

The Lee A. Sartori Tax Research and Writing Award

This award recognizes and promotes the importance of being able to effectively research and communicate difficult and ever-changing tax law in order to advocate, support, and achieve favorable outcomes. Named for a graduate and longtime adjunct professor in the Walsh MST program, this award annually honors the student whose performance in the Walsh tax research class reflects Professor Sartori’s high standards of competence and creativity in research and writing.